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The North Carolina A&T State University ADVANCE Institutional Transformation project is a catalyst for university-wide systemic changes that increase the representation of women at all levels.

Vision & Mission

Vision: For NCA&T to be an enabled institution that is committed to the growth, development, and advancement of all faculty, but particularly women STEM/SBS faculty.

Mission: To facilitate dynamic transformations that (1) promote equity and reduce barriers for the recruitment and advancement of women at all academic levels; (2) foster greater self-efficacy for women in the areas of scholarship and engagement; and (3) inform best practices for the advancement of women through a deeper understanding of the roles of gender and gender/race intersectionality.

Award

Award #: HRD- 1409799

Sponsor: National Science Foundation

What does the IT stand for and mean?

IT: Institutional Transformation supports the development of innovative organizational change strategies to produce comprehensive change within one non-profit two-year or four-year academic institution across all STEM disciplines. ADVANCE (IT) projects are designed to transform institutional practices and climate at universities and colleges in order to recruit, retain and promote women in STEM academic careers. Typical activities include, but are not limited to: reviewing, updating, and clarifying hiring, promotion and tenure policies, developing new policies and programs such as dual-career hiring and mentoring programs, providing faculty development and leadership training, and conducting surveys and collecting data to analyze campus climate.

Adrienne-Aiken-Morgan

Scholar Spotlight

Dr. Adrienne Aiken Morgan

Assistant Professor
Psychology
College of Health and Human Sciences

Adrienne Aiken Morgan, PhD, is an Assistant Professor and Director of the Biobehavioral Research on Aging, Cognition, and Health (BRACH) laboratory in the Department of Psychology at North Carolina A&T State University. She received a BA in psychology from Florida A&M University and a MS and PhD in clinical neuropsychology from the University of Florida. She completed postdoctoral training in gerontology at the Duke University Center for the Study of Aging and Human Development. Dr. Morgan’s research interests lie at the intersection of four areas of inquiry: sociocultural experience (e.g., race & ethnicity, education); cognition; aging; and health. Taken together, her program of research examines the influence of social and health disparities on cognitive aging in African American adults. She seeks to develop and implement behavioral health interventions to improve cardiovascular and obesity-related health outcomes and prevent cognitive dysfunction and dementia-onset in African American communities at disproportionate risk

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